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Indeed, the end of the poem is very evocative. It invites the imagination to empathize and to fill the gap. No one can be omniscient; there is always more, expanding into infinite space.

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Aug 28, 2023Liked by Eve Grubin

I love this, thank you. It struck me that for the narrator to be with her deceased son Abel, she herself must be dead in some sense. Additionally, in the original Hebrew, the last line can also be read as a complete sentence: "Tell him that I am." It deepens the ambiguity beautifully. The poem can be read both as a mother reaching out to her wayward son, and a voice from beyond, reminding history's first murderer of the soul's eternal life.

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